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Vagabond Journey

Archaeology Blog

Welcome to Vagabondjourney.com’s archaeology blog. This is a resource for archaeology information around the world as well as a portal for people who wish to become archaeologist to find information on how to get into the profession along with stories from archaeological excavations, information on how to become an archaeologist, photos from sites that I have worked on, and links to important/ interesting archaeology websites. 

Archaeology Job/ Field schools/ Volunteer Opportunities

Past Horizons– A website with many volunteer opportunities around the planet. Really good.

Shovelbums.org– The main website for finding professional archaeology fieldwork opportunities in the USA. Also has information on international field schools.

Archaeology Fieldwork.com– Website with tons of information on working in cultural resource management (C.R.M) in North America. Also has a large collection of links of contract archaeology firms from many places on the globe.

Florida Atlantic University Field School on the Manabi Coast of Ecuador– This is the field school where I received my archaeology training. I went straight from this excavation into professional field work. I highly recommend this field school.

  • Rhodes Archaeology Museum

    Inquisitive children …

  • Q&A: What Is The True Life Of An Archaeologist?

    Those archaeology days …

  • It’s A Qing Dynasty Fresco Not A Coloring Book! Another Botched Restoration

    Not everything should get a fresh coat of paint (ancient frescoes included).

  • Palenque – Part 2

    I’ve been asked to post more pictures of Palenque. Hope you enjoy: This is a shot of Mayan tradesmen setting up for the day at the base of one of the pyramids. A stone for sacrifices? I don’t know. There were a couple of these. Both were at the bottom of pyramids. Of course, that [...]

  • Ruins of Palenque

    On the morning of Feb. 10th, I got up and after breakfast at Don Mucho’s I left on foot for the ruins. Right outside El Panchan, a turn to the left takes me to a gate with a guy standing around with a machine gun and a guy charging 27 pesos to get a wristband [...]

  • Göbekli Tepe: the Rise of Agriculture, the Fall of the Nomad

    The human was born a traveling animal. For over 100,000 years we walked across the great Savannas, made way through the jungles, camped in Arctic tundra, and hunted and foraged in the forests of this planet. Then, a little over 10,000 years ago, a blip in the timeline of our species, we started laying down our satchels, building our shelters with a sense of permanence, and began cultivating the grains and animals in our surroundings. This great event, perhaps the largest shift in human cultural evolution, happened around a great temple now called Göbekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey.

    This is the ancient story of the rise of the farmer, the fall of the nomad.

  • Archaeology Fieldwork in China

    While archaeology is a professional trade that requires many years of university study and, often, advanced degrees to get into, there are various archaeological volunteer opportunities that you can engage in or field schools operating in China.

  • Is Going to University for Archaeology Worth It

    Is going to university for archaeology in England worth the expense? Hello Brandy, This is a difficult question to field, and one which obviously can only be answered from the depths of your own intuition, common sense, and command of logic.  But I can offer some advice, based on my experience of earning an anthropology degree [...]

  • Monte Alban Archaeology Site

    OAXACA, Mexico- Monte Alban sits on a flat top, mini plateau that has a 360 degree view of the surrounding Oaxaca Valley and far off into the Sierra Madres in the distance. Beautiful. Archaeology sites are often become big tourists sites for a reason: They were often built in truly spectacular locations. Who among us [...]

  • How to Choose an Archaeology Field School

    How to choose an archaeology field school ? Hello Yogi, First of all, make sure that the archaeology fieldwork programs that you are looking into are actual field schools. Make sure that it is for a duration for at least six weeks, that it is taught by an accredited university, and that you get some kind of certification (or [...]