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Mexico Visa

Travel Visas to Mexico The visa policy of Mexico is generally pretty liberal in these current times where it seems in vogue for governments to attempt to raise revenue by charging ridiculous visa fees, multi-country immigration zones which give only a handful of days for each country, and short duration tourist visas. Mexico is a [...]

Travel Visas to Mexico

The visa policy of Mexico is generally pretty liberal in these current times where it seems in vogue for governments to attempt to raise revenue by charging ridiculous visa fees, multi-country immigration zones which give only a handful of days for each country, and short duration tourist visas. Mexico is a true beacon for the world traveler, as many can just show up and be given 180 days on arrival, which can be renewed by simply exiting the country and then returning. Partly due to this fact, Mexico has a lively long term traveler community.

Tourist visas

Tourists from the following countries can be given up to 180 day visas to Mexico upon arrival:

  • Andorra
  • Anguilla
  • Argentina
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belgium
  • Belize
  • Bermuda
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada
  • Cayman Islands
  • Chile
  • Cyprus
  • Cook Islands
  • Costa Rica
  • Croatia
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Faroe Islands
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Gibraltar
  • Greece
  • Greenland
  • Guam
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Republic of Korea
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macau
  • Marshall Islands
  • Federated States of Micronesia
  • Monaco
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Palau
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Puerto Rico
  • Romania
  • San Marino
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Tokelau
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Turks and Caicos Islands
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Uruguay
  • Venezuela
  • Wallis and Futuna

Work Visas

Mexico’s visa policy beyond simple tourist visas gets a little more opaque. Many travelers claim that a tourist visa can be upgraded to a work visa, but this may be left up to the desecration of the issuing party.

Visa Extensions

Extended a tourist visa from within Mexico is a real hit and miss endeavorer, and often involves a little baksheesh. Most travelers find it easier to just do a visa run.

More information about travel visas

More information about Mexico

  • Travelogue entries about Mexico

Mexico Travel Guide

Mexico Travel Guide

More Vagabond Journey.com Travel Guides

Ask questions or add comments about visas to Mexico

Filed under: Mexico, Visas

About the Author:

Wade Shepard is the founder and editor of Vagabond Journey. He has been traveling the world since 1999, through 88 countries. He is the author of the book, Ghost Cities of China, and contributes to The Guardian, Forbes, Bloomberg, The Diplomat, the South China Morning Post, and other publications. has written 3422 posts on Vagabond Journey. Contact the author.

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4 comments… add one

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  • Wade October 31, 2010, 11:33 pm

    Many nationalities can receive 180 day tourist visas upon entry, which can be renewed easily by doing visa runs to Guatemala, Belize, or the USA.

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  • FM3 Visa to Mexico November 15, 2010, 4:02 pm

    Well, the advantage of an FM3 is it includes a 1-yr visa, is a Mexican ID and it Mexicqn Senior Citizen Discount card, itself – Free. Actually, the FM2 confers Gringo’s a way to avoid Capital Gains Tax on property sales in Mexico and allows for a longer stay. The FM1 is the form they’re supposed to staple into your Passport, crossing the Mexican frontier and you know you get 6 months – the other ones you get a year. Not everybody needs an FM3 – just extranjero’s that don’t want to do visa runs every 6 months or want to buy a car there. You know – might see a VW Bug or a sailboat someplace in Mexico and the FM3 is the document needed first.

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  • LAbackpackerChick November 14, 2011, 12:57 am

    I want to get a work visa but I’m afraid it will be super complicated. I just want to take advantage of the upcoming high season over here on the Yucatan coast but no one will hire me without papers. Ironic for an American finding it difficult to work without papers in Mexico huh? ha

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    • Vagabond Journey Guides November 14, 2011, 1:05 am

      Once you get away from the Yucatan things get way easier as far as work goes. In other states, such as Chiapas and Oaxaca I’ve known people who’ve gotten work visas pretty easy. Also, if you pay out a little a residency permit is not too difficult to get. Let me know how you make out.

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