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El Imposible es Posible

El Imposible National Park, El Salvador“Twenty dollars, hostel and El Salvador are three words that shouldn’t be said in the same sentence.” That was Tez’s opinion as we walked back from dinner and I had to agree with him. We had recently arrived into the small town of San Miguelito outside of El Imposbile National [...]

El Imposible National Park, El Salvador

“Twenty dollars, hostel and El Salvador are three words that shouldn’t be said in the same sentence.” That was Tez’s opinion as we walked back from dinner and I had to agree with him. We had recently arrived into the small town of San Miguelito outside of El Imposbile National Park and checked into the only lodging available feeling like we were just bummed (English slang). I say we arrived ‘in town’ but I think the word ‘town’ is the wrong adjective to describe our location. The place was really a smattering of small houses alongside a mountain road. One house had some tables in front that doubled as a cocina and another house was also a tienda. Other than Hostal El Imposible that was all that existed.


When I came to El Salvador I came with zero expectations and only the vaguest idea of where I was going or what I was going to do. So, when I ran into Tez in the central square of Suchitoto I felt El Salvador should be a good time. I first met Tez in Lanquin when visiting Semuc Champey and he always had a joke or good story to tell. When we went our separate ways after Lanquin I was hoping we would run into another again. Tez mentioned hiking in El Imposible and I jumped at the opportunity to travel with someone I knew, get off the backpacker trail, and do some trekking.

Neither of were interested in staying in Hostal El Imposible any longer than we needed to so our Plan B was to use a tent that Tez has been carrying around for the last three months and camp for the next two nights in the park. All in all the price of camping for two nights came to a grand total of $1.00 plus the $6.00 entrance fee. With only the tent fabric and a silk sleep sack as padding my sleep at night was anything but restful but the experience of eating over a camp fire and staying outdoors for a prolonged period away from other travelers was worth it.

From El Imposible 2010-12
Home Sweet Home for two nights

Hiking in the park was similar to other hikes I’ve been on recently; which is to say it was a lot of walking up-hill. The first day we did a four kilometer hike down to a river. Going down was an easy hike but the two kilometers back was an hour stairmaster workout. The second day was an 8 kilometer hike to a lookout point with a 360º view of the park. Of course, a lookout means a continuous walk uphill again. The only annoyance with the hikes in El Imposible was the parks insistence that you have a guide. In the park a guide isn’t necessary for keeping on paths because they are all well-trodden and clearly marked. This ‘necessity’ only exists to provide employment. I don’t mind the idea of employing locals but if a guide is necessary and you have to pay an $10 this should be marked on the entrance sign with the entrance and camping fees. Not sprung on you after entering the park.

From El Imposible 2010-12
One view of ‘El Imposible’

My alarm went off at 6:00 am on the third morning and after two days of hiking and sleeping on the ground Tez and I jumped out of the tent eager to pack up and get to some place with a shower and a proper bed.

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Filed under: Cubicle Ditcher, El Salvador

About the Author:

Sam Langley left a comfortable and profitable job with an insurance company in the USA to travel the world. He has been going for years, and has not stopped yet. Keep up with his travels on his blog at Cubicle Ditcher. has written 147 posts on Vagabond Journey. Contact the author.