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Work in Istanbul- Round Four

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Search for a job in Istanbul Round 4

After three unsuccessful rounds of searching for work in Istanbul, I stumbled into an interview with the Dilge English institute.

I even went to a barber for a hair cut before this visit.

I even let the barber trim my beard.
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Wade from Vagabond Journey.com
in Istanbul, Turkey- February 21, 2009
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I meant business as I strode up the steps for this interview, but I still went belly up.

Oh well.

I went through the interview process, learned about the Callan teaching method – which is just an institutionalized attempt to teach a language through psudeo-natural means: Learn by listening and “Don’t think about what you are saying” and all of that jive. I even got a tour of the school.

In the end I agreed to come by the next day to observe a class. 7:15 PM tomorrow night was the appointed time.

I did not make it.

Rather, I found myself standing in a stair well in an Istanbul suburb an hour outside of the city center as Chaya was interviewed for two hours at another English school. I thought that an entire evening was more than enough time for us both to take care of our respective job hunt duties.

I thought wrong.

There was no way that either of us thought that Chaya’s interviewer would talk at her for two hours. I stood in the stairwell watching the time tick by: half hour gone, one hour gone, at an hour and a half I knew that I was not going to make it back to the city to for the next stage of my job interview. I did not want to storm in on Chaya’s interview to tell the fellow interviewing her to shut up, and I also could not expect Chaya to cut him short.

When you are being interviewed for a job, it is a matter of prison justice: you just bend over and take it.

Chaya took it for two hours and got a job. I stood around with my nuts in my hand as another job opportunity flew by.

Oh well, I could tell that Dilge English did not want to hire me anyway.

Maybe dressing up, putting on a show, and playing identity games to get a real job is too much to expect from myself.

There are things that people are good at, and things that they are not. I do not seem to be very good at anything that requires interacting with other people, following rules, showing undue respect, or being told what to do. In fact, I am not really that good at anything that could be considered a job.

Perhaps this is why I write words.

Square pegs often can not sneak into circular holes. I tried, though, but was only shown just how square I really am.

The knowledge of one dead end is just the impetus needed to try and find another road. Problems only arise when you keep going on a bad path and walk ever farther into the wilderness. Clear paths often skirt right around brick walls, there are usually bridges over gaping trenches, and their are many roads that cut through virgin wilderness. Possibilities are everywhere, you just need to find them.

Looking for possibilities in Istanbul. Dreaming up great ideas that will only fall fallow into more great ideas.

Related Pages:
Search for a Job in Istanbul round 3
Round Two
Round One

Search for a job in Istanbul Round 4

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Filed under: Eastern Europe, Europe, Turkey

About the Author:

Wade Shepard is the founder and editor of Vagabond Journey. He has been traveling the world since 1999, through 76 countries. He is the author of the book, Ghost Cities of China, and contributes to Forbes, The Diplomat, the South China Morning Post, and other publications. has written 3048 posts on Vagabond Journey. Contact the author.

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