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Grape Eating Tradition at Midnight of New Year’s Eve in Mexico, Spain, and Other Hispanic Countries

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A surplus grapes in the Alicante region of Spain is said to have lead to the tradition of eating this fruit at the stroke of midnight throughout the Hispanic world. The practice is to eat 12 grapes — one at each stoke of the clock which announces the midnight hour — on New Year’s Eve. Each grape represents a month of the year ahead, and the quality of each grape is suppose to represent the quality of month you should expect. So if your sixth grape is mushy and gross, then be prepared for hardships in June.

As I ate my twelve grapes in Mexico as the fireworks rocketed up into the sky, number eight was rotten, but number 12 was perfect and crisp. Therefore, as the tradition goes, my August 2012 should be a downer, but my fortunes should rise by December. Unfortunately, my poor wife’s grapes were all accidentally smushed in my pocket.

Grapes

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Filed under: Culture and Society, Food

About the Author:

Wade Shepard is the founder and editor of Vagabond Journey. He has been traveling the world since 1999, through 76 countries. He is the author of the book, Ghost Cities of China, and contributes to Forbes, The Diplomat, the South China Morning Post, and other publications. has written 3048 posts on Vagabond Journey. Contact the author.

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