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Business Men can be Good Guys too

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Business men can be good guys, too

“I really hate seeing animals treated like this,” a fat American spoke gruffly as a Bedouin quickly rode by on a beleaguered looking horse.

The business man seemed to be trying to give himself a big self-congratulatory pat on the back in the presence of his business chums. Maybe he thought that they were dying to hear of his high moral ideas.

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Wade from Vagabond Journey.com
in Jordan- May, 2009
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His American business chums did not bite on to the chuck of meat that their chubby friend was throwing down. It was my impression that he was just trying to show off how good of a guy he is by trying to act bitter about the inhumanity of others.

He seemed to be only pretending that he cared, and his friends deflected this put-on well. They ignored him. Perhaps the huffing and puffing and swinging of his burly jowls back and forth was enough to give away his act.

It is interesting to me how people like to criticize other people in an effort to confirm to themselves and their companions that they are, in fact, good people.

The irony comes in when we consider how often people tend to admire traits that they do not posses and scorn the ones that they do.

When I hear someone criticize another person I immediately take that criticism as a reflection of themselves. Human beings are notoriously ego-centric beings, and scarcely speak of things that do not have to do with themselves.

Perhaps I am doing the same thing right now.


Chaya kissing a camel.

The Lorax of Petra

Business men can be good guys, too

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Filed under: Culture and Society, Intercultural Conflict, Jordan, Middle East

About the Author:

Wade Shepard is the founder and editor of Vagabond Journey. He has been traveling the world since 1999, through 76 countries. He is the author of the book, Ghost Cities of China, and contributes to Forbes, The Diplomat, the South China Morning Post, and other publications. has written 3053 posts on Vagabond Journey. Contact the author.

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Wade Shepard is currently in: Cincinnati, Ohio, USAMap

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