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Blog Construction is Like Riding a Bike

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Blog Construction is Like Riding a Bike

I can remember when I was a small child trying in vain to ride a bicycle. My mother would hopefully tell me that as soon as I was able to ride it once, I would always be able to.

Riding a bicycle was seemed to me like it would be some glory moment that would only come at the end of a long struggle.

It was a long struggle. I thought about riding my bike all day at school, and as soon as I would arrive home I would jump right into the seat. I fell down, I crashed, I hurt myself, but I kept trying. My parents supported me in this endeavor and encouraged my every attempt. They picked me up off the ground, tended to my wounds, and told me that I would get it next time.

And I truly believed that I could do it the next time, as I would crash again.

Eventually, this next time came. I remember riding my bicycle for the first time by myself.

“Mom, are you still holding on to the seat!?!”

“No! You are riding on your own!”

I tried hard and I did it.
————–
Wade from Vagabond Journey.com
in Istanbul, Turkey- February 28, 2009
Travelogue
Travel Photos — Travel Guide
All Travelogue Entries
————–

Making this website and blog is a similar venture. When I first began I knew nothing about computers. I did not even know how to make a new folder in My Documents on Windows. I was lost, and even the very simple Blogger system confused me.

I would look at every one else’s websites and blogs and realize that they knew what they were doing, and I knew nothing.

So I worked hard. I tried, I fell down, and, luckily, I had a few friends who would pick me back up, nurse my wounds, and give me encouragement that I would get it the next time. I was again waiting for the glorious “next time” moment when I would realize that I was riding all by myself.

So I kept working, ever trying to get an impression of how these websites, blogs, and the internet worked. I was looking for a map. As time went by my pages became better and better, I was learning a little more everyday. Again, I was trying to get to some glory moment that would only come at the end of a long struggle. I was trying to get to the point where the storm would break and the seas would be calm.

These past few days I made some changes to my travelogue and homepage. Around half way through making the changes, I realized something: I was not stressed out, everything seemed easy, and all was working out. I would decide that I wanted to make a change, do a quick search on the internet to find out how to do it, get the instructions, and then do it. It was all very simple.

The storm broke. I was riding my bike on my own.

My mother is no longer holding on to the seat. I have an impression of how this all comes together; I have a knowledge base that I can work from. I still know very little, but I now have my sea-legs and feel as if I can get through any storm.

Changes made yesterday
1. I deactivated the no-follow links in the comment forms, so the search bots will now follow all active links (though I moderate the comments and don’t publish spam).

2. I included a Favicon to the internet browser tab. I need to get a different image though because the one I am using has too much detail and its resolution is squished.

3. Learned how to include sound files on blog.

I am not yet ready for the BMX trials, I know, I am just happy to be riding on the kiddi-track. I am getting somewhere. I am glad that I was raised by parents who would never let me give up.

Related Pages:
The Rites of Travel Website Construction
Learning Website Construction
Under the wing of the HoboTraveler
The trauma of building a website

Blog Construction is Like Riding a Bike

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Filed under: Eastern Europe, Europe, Turkey

About the Author:

Wade Shepard is the founder and editor of Vagabond Journey. He has been traveling the world since 1999, through 76 countries. He is the author of the book, Ghost Cities of China, and contributes to Forbes, The Diplomat, the South China Morning Post, and other publications. has written 3053 posts on Vagabond Journey. Contact the author.

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Wade Shepard is currently in: Cincinnati, Ohio, USAMap